The first gin infused with Scottish tea leaves

A Scots firm has announced the launch of GINTÌ, Scotland’s first premium gin infused with Scottish tea leaves which are both grown and harvested on Fordhead Farm in Stirlingshire.

Created in Kinrara Distillery, located in Cairngorm National Park, this new Scottish gin is made with botanicals such as juniper, lemon peel, cubeb, angelica root and liquorice with the addition of single estate Scottish tea.

The London dry style gin has a smooth finish to every sip and offers a clean, crisp flavour and texture provided by the tannis from the black tea, which is grown on the family farm.

Gin novices and aficionados alike will initially be met with smells of citrus and juniper, followed by unique floral tastes from the tea.

The signature recipe has been expertly blended with tea which is grown in tunnels based on the farm and heated by renewable energy, which gives the tea plants the humid conditions to grow.

GINTÌ founder and director Matt Lamb said: ‘Tì derives from the Gaelic word for tea, and we wanted to create a connection between our Scottish provenance and our main botanical.

‘The tea is handpicked, hand rolled and processed on our farm and then cold steeped overnight in the still, to let the subtle flavour of tea develop the gin’s unique flavour profile.

‘There’s nothing like it on the premium gin market right now, so we’re really pleased to be able to give our customers something new and unique.’

GINTÌ is presented in a simple, elegant 70cl bottle sealed by a turquoise wax top and features a label adorned with flecks of tea and copper detailing which pays homage to key materials in the distilling process.

GINTÌ is best served over ice with regular and a sliver of lemon rind.

Gin lovers can order GINTÌ (£37.50, 41.3% ABV) from the company website and can be sampled in a number of Stirling and Glasgow bars, including the Gin Spa at Gin71.

For more details, visit the GINTÌ website

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